Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S.

Articulate While Black Barack Obama Language and Race in the U S Barack Obama is widely considered one of the most powerful and charismatic speakers of our age Without missing a beat he often moves between Washington insider talk and culturally Black ways of speak

  • Title: Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S.
  • Author: H. Samy Alim Geneva Smitherman Foreward by Michael Eric Dyson
  • ISBN: 9780199812981
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • Barack Obama is widely considered one of the most powerful and charismatic speakers of our age Without missing a beat, he often moves between Washington insider talk and culturally Black ways of speaking as shown in a famous YouTube clip, where Obama declined the change offered to him by a Black cashier in a Washington, D.C restaurant with the phrase, Nah, we straight.Barack Obama is widely considered one of the most powerful and charismatic speakers of our age Without missing a beat, he often moves between Washington insider talk and culturally Black ways of speaking as shown in a famous YouTube clip, where Obama declined the change offered to him by a Black cashier in a Washington, D.C restaurant with the phrase, Nah, we straight In Articulate While Black, two renowned scholars of Black Language address language and racial politics in the U.S through an insightful examination of President Barack Obama s language use and America s response to it In this eloquently written and powerfully argued book, H Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman provide new insights about President Obama and the relationship between language and race in contemporary society Throughout, they analyze several racially loaded, cultural linguistic controversies involving the President from his use of Black Language and his articulateness to his Race Speech, the so called fist bump, and his relationship to Hip Hop Culture.Using their analysis of Barack Obama as a point of departure, Alim and Smitherman reveal how major debates about language, race, and educational inequality erupt into moments of racial crisis in America In challenging American ideas about language, race, education, and power, they help take the national dialogue on race to the next level In much the same way that Cornel West revealed nearly two decades ago that race matters, Alim and Smitherman in this groundbreaking book show how deeply language matters to the national conversation on race and in our daily lives.

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      H. Samy Alim Geneva Smitherman Foreward by Michael Eric Dyson

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    1. H. Samy Alim Geneva Smitherman Foreward by Michael Eric Dyson

      H. Samy Alim Geneva Smitherman Foreward by Michael Eric Dyson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S. book, this is one of the most wanted H. Samy Alim Geneva Smitherman Foreward by Michael Eric Dyson author readers around the world.

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    Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S. Comment

    1. As sociolinguistics person, I am elated a popular secretly academic book like this even exists The author style shifts codeswitchs between black and academic English with ease, keeps you laughing, keeps you engaged, and most importantly, keeps you learning Aside from this being just a really good book, I am happy to see an academic actively resisting academic norms and publishing a book that is both a legitimate political statement and a legitimate middle finger to hierarchy.Great for undergrad [...]


    2. In 2008, U.S citizens elected their first black president Kind of It depends on whom you ask Some say Barack Obama is black because he embodies the truest definition of the term African American his father was from Kenya and his mother hailed from Kansas Others declare that Obama is not black but biracial since his mother is white And well intentioned, colorblind souls claim his race no longer matters because his election ushered in a post racial society.If there s one thing on which these dispa [...]


    3. I had high hopes for this book, and indeed the first half was pretty interesting, but it gradually became less interesting as the book progressed I think part of the problem is that the book doesn t really know what it s trying to be a book about Obama s manner s of speech, about Black language, or about how to better value and teach respect for diversity I found the ending, which was essentially a lesson plan for teachers to discuss Black English with their students, to be particularly frustrat [...]


    4. I ve been reading this book on and off as I finished my diss and just got back to finishing it It is such an amazing book not only for thinking about Barack Obama as a model for twenty first century language, but in thinking about the trends over the last twenty years As we move into the twenty first century and Black language has become mainstream in hip hop and now having a President who code switches, it s amazing to think we are still holding so tightly to Standard White English This book d [...]


    5. Well written book, but I came away from it as someone who paid a lot of attention during the election feeling like I didn t really get much out of it A lot of the book seemed to be arguing against an audience who would never read it The juicy bits, like the comparison of Obama s speech to some specific rhetorical moves in sermons, were grand, but they were few and far between.Also had a few issues that every academic book has Too much time on reviewing at the end, too much time spent premise set [...]


    6. This book provides an excellent also witty and enjoyable discussion of the ways that American Blackness is read performed and perceived in the public sphere Veteran African American linguist, Geneva Smitherman and lead author, H Samy Alim, draw on recorded and transcribed discourse interactions of President Obama with various demographic audiences, as well as research conducted about the perception of his language and his blackness as it was taken up in the press and social media They draw impor [...]


    7. The term Black English offends me This is simply just another means of lowering the bar for African Americans The notion that Barack Obama is accessible because he can speak Black English is ludicrous and reeks of Ebonics in the 1990 s My Sisters came to this country in the 70 s and they were expected to learn English not Black English or White English , simply English


    8. Alim and Smitherman do a nice job of discussing a frequently ignored area of sociolinguistics variation within the individual As an educator, I especially liked the lesson plans in Chapter 6, although I m not sure they belong in this book Still, I m gonna use them.



    9. Fascinating look at how Barack Obama s ability to utilize multiple rhetorical styles helped him win the Presidency Argues for a frank discussion about race in America.


    10. Interesting Not exactly what I was looking for, but definitely an interesting and eye opening read Worth reading just for info on the dap


    11. My professor mentioned this book in class she said her sister s boss wrote it so I thought I would check it out and see what it s all about lol




    12. Since outright racial discrimination is legally banned though still widely practiced , language has become an even important vehicle in the denial of access to resources Linguistic profiling and discrimination are widely accepted practices in our society This book was fantastic, and I highly recommend it to anyone and everyone, even if you think you have no interest in linguistics, pick it up or borrow it from me.


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